Bosnian Muslims: “How did we deserve this?”

Eldin Elezovic dreamed of becoming a football star while growing up in Stolac, in what was then the Socialist Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina and part of Yugoslavia. In June 1993, he remembers spending a hot summer’s day playing football with friends. It would be his last day of freedom for the next nine months.

Read More

“Irrational Optimism” and Bosnia’s IT Ticket to a Stronger Economy

Bosnia and Herzegovina emerges as a new tech hotspot with high hopes that it can soon compete on a global scale

Read More

Bosnian Advocates Push for LGBTQ Rights Ahead of Global Day of Action

June is Gay Pride Month in the U.S., but the most important global day for gay rights is coming up on May 17. It’s the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia, or IDAHOT for short.

Read More

In Bosnia, Changing Films Depict a War That “Never Stopped”

As bombs crushed much of Aleppo into dust last fall, and Syrian civilians were targeted by snipers, the brutal siege was repeatedly compared to that of Sarajevo in the mid 90s. The war in Bosnia was one of several conflicts that marked the breakup of the former Yugoslavia. Stories of the war and its after-effects still dominate the country’s small film industry two decades later.

Read More

“What Are We Going to Do with This Now?” Questions and Catharsis at the Bosnian-Herzegovinian Film Festival

On opening night of the 14th Annual Bosnian-Herzegovinian Film Festival (BHFF) in New York City, about a dozen hesitant hands out of 200 went up when Zlata Filipović asked the audience who didn’t have roots in the Balkans. This year’s four-evening-long, 13-film festival, which is sure to be one of New York’s most intimate, celebrated its largest total attendance to date and marked a welcome moment of catharsis for the Bosnian diaspora and broader community of former Yugoslavia.

Read More

Making Films as Psychoanalysis, Artist Reinterprets the Bosnian “War Film”

Twenty years after the end of the Yugoslav Civil War, artist Damir Avdagic brought together three other twenty-somethings in Los Angeles to talk. They represented each of the ethnic groups involved in the conflict that killed more than 100,000 people and displaced two million, including Avdagic’s own family.

Read More